Tag Archives: woman

Look For This Week’s Limited Releases In Theaters Near You

There are few interesting indie releases opening in local theaters this weekend, alongside Jordan Peele’s directorial horror debut Get Out. The first is a war-drama titled Bitter Harvest, starring Max Irons (The Host, Woman in Gold) and Samantha Barks (Les Miserables, The Christmas Candle) as lovers facing the oncoming Ukraine Genocide of 1932-1933 under Joseph Stalin. The film comes from director George Mendeluk and follows a young artists (Irons) as he works to save his love, Natalka (Barks), from being rounded up and executed as part of the death-by-starvation camps that would be made all the more famous during Hitler’s time in Nazi Germany during World War II. The script comes from writer Richard Bachynsky Hoover and co-stars Terence Stamp (Superman, Young Guns) and Barry Pepper (Saving Private Ryan, The Green Mile). Continue reading

This Week in Film History….

serpico

Director Sydney Lumet‘s 1973 undercover police drama Serpico earned Al Pacino his second Oscar nomination for Best Actor. While it was another in a long-running streak of Oscar nominations for Pacino that resulted in no wins until 1992’s Scent of a Woman, Serpico‘s other Oscar nomination was for Best Adapted Screenplay for screenwriters Waldo Salt (Midnight Cowboy, The Day of the Locust) and Norman Wexler (Saturday Night Fever, Staying Alive). Although Serpico proved to be the last Oscar-worthy project of Wexler’s, Waldo Salt had a much longer, and much darker story in Hollywood screenwriting history.

Waldo Salt was born on October 18, 1914 and grew up in Chicago an accomplished academic. He was so accomplished, in fact, that he graduated from Stanford University at the same time his friends were graduating from high school. Shortly thereafter, Salt was in Hollywood working as a screenwriter for MGM. There he worked on and assisted with various writing projects, but his first solo writing adaptation was with a 1937 film called The Bride Wore Red. The next year, Salt joined the American Communist Party, putting himself on the radar for the House Un-American Activities Committee during the Red Scare/McCarthy era 12 years later. Continue reading

Memorable Movie Moments…

Today’s Memorable Movie Moment takes us back to 1978, for the excellent cinematography in a film called Days of Heaven. Written and directed by 3x Oscar nominee Terrence Malick (The Thin Red Line, The Tree of Life), Days of Heaven is an American epic that follows a young couple, Bill and Abby, during the Expansionist era in 1916. Moving from Chicago to Texas in search of work, the two become involved in a scheme to have Abby marry a wealthy farmer who is close to death in order to gain his fortune. This, of course doesn’t go according to plan and so a dramatic conflict of jealousy and deceit ensues, loosely based on a backstory that first appeared in Alexander DumasThe Three Musketeers.

Starring Richard Gere (An Officer and a Gentlemen, Pretty Woman), Brooke Adams (Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Dead Zone), and Sam Shepard (Swordfish, Black Hawk Down), the film received Oscar nominations for Best Costume Design, Best Sound, and Best Music – Original Score. Although it failed to win any of these awards, Days of Heaven did receive the Oscar for Best Cinematography for Nestor Almendros. Continue reading

Iconic Actor Gene Wilder Has Passed Away at the Age of 83

wilder

Legendary comedic actor Gene Wilder, best known for his roles in films like Young Frankenstein, The Producers, Blazing Saddles, and Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, passed away Monday after a struggle with Alzheimer’s Disease. The actor was twice nominated for an Academy Award, one for his role in The Producers and the other as co-writer with Mel Brooks for Young Frankenstein. Wilder first gained attention in a production of Off Broadway’s Roots in 1961. He then continued working in television and on Broadway for a number of years, where he first caught the eye of filmmaker Mel Brooks. The actor starred in a production of Bonnie and Clyde in 1967 before teaming up with Brooks for his breakout role in The Producers, which earned him his first nomination for Best Supporting Actor. Continue reading

This Week In Movie History…

August 15th is a very significant date in the history of film…for two reasons. We’ll cover them here in order by date, but both are, no doubt, some of the most memorable advances in movies and storytelling.

On August 15, 1934, director Christy Cabanne (The Mummy’s Hand, Scared to Death) released the first audio-visual film adaptation of Charlotte Bronte‘s famous novel Jane Eyre. Excluding the popularity of the novel, the film was part of a series of classic-literary adaptations produced by Monogram Pictures between 1933-1934. Four classic 19th-century novels were all made into big-screen adaptations that featured sound, a new technology for the era. The novels were Oliver Twist, Black Beauty, Jane Eyre, and The Moonstone. Cabanne was well-known at the time as a silent film director, but was also beginning to indulge in sound-projects. For the movie, which only runs a total of 62 minutes, the studio recruited actors Colin Clive, best known for the role of Dr. Frankenstein in the original 1931 James Whales’ classic, and newcomer Virginia Bruce (Born to Dance, The Invisible Woman) to star as Jane Eyre. Oscar-nominated screenwriter Adele Comandini (Beyond Tomorrow, Three Smart Girls) to adapt Bronte’s novel for the film (which admittedly must have been a challenge considering Jane Eyre runs for a total of 38 chapters with 400+ pages in most publications).

Also on August 15th, but in 1979, Oscar-winning director Francis Ford Coppola (The Godfather, The Conversation) released his world-renowned masterpiece, Apocalypse Now. The film is famous not only for its cinematic brilliance, but also for its whirlwind of a production Continue reading

New Documentary Titled ‘De Palma’ Seeing Release This Week

A new documentary titled De Palma is seeing release this week from directors Jake Paltrow (The Good Night, Boardwalk Empire) and Noah Baumbach (The Squid and the Whale, Greenberg). The film is a chronicle of the life and work of acclaimed director Brian De Palma, whose major body of work has spanned from the 1970s to the present with films like Carrie (1976), a Stephen King novel, Scarface (1983) with Al Pacino (The Godfather, Scent of a Woman) and Michelle Pfeiffer (The Fabulous Baker Boys, Batman Returns), and The Untouchables (1987) with Kevin Costner (Waterworld, Dances with Wolves), Robert De Niro (Goodfellas, Casino), and Sean Connery (Diamonds are Forever, The Hunt for Red October). Despite all of the acclaim and success earned by these films, De Palma is one of the many artists who has never been recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The Untouchables saw Sean Connery win his first Oscar in 1988, Continue reading

‘Batman Vs Superman’ Continues To Break Box-Office Records

DC Comic‘s latest big screen endeavor, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, from director Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen), is continuing to do incredibly well at the domestic and international box office, despite the terrible reviews from critics, and a pretty decent body of fans. The film has grossed more than $420 million worldwide, but it’s not the enormous success that should have fans and studio execs worried, its what lies ahead that could be potentially hazardous. The problem is that DC and the production studios royally fucked up in terms of their plan to unveil their Justice League movies. Unlike Marvel, who succeeded in introducing all of the Avengers characters in film-worthy, individual projects, DC left Batman vs Superman, not only with the task of serving as a sequel to Man of Steel (2013), but also of introducing the other Justice League characters, including Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot), the Flash (Ezra Miller), and Aquaman (Jason Momoa). Continue reading

Filmmaker Marc Abraham’s ‘I Saw The Light’ Seeing Limited Release This Friday

Last year, producer-turned-writer/director Marc Abraham (Air Force One, Children of Men) debuted his new biographical drama, I Saw The Light, at the Toronto International Film Festival. The film is a portrayal of the life of country music singer/songwriter Hank Williams Jr., and was adapted by Abraham from the book Hank Williams: The Biography by authors Colin Escott, George Merritt, and William MacEwen. Starring as Williams is actor Tom Hiddleston (Midnight in Paris, The Avengers), appearing alongside co-stars Elizabeth Olsen (Godzilla, Avengers: Age of Ultron), David Krumholtz (Harold and Kumar Go To White Castle, This Is The End), Bradley Whitford (Scent of a Woman, Saving Mr. Banks), and Cherry Jones (Signs, The Village). Although the film has not been well received by critics, fans have praised the performances of both Hiddleston, and Elizabeth Olsen as his first wife Audrey Mae. Some movie-goers will be able to see it in theaters this weekend, but the trailer is available here on MADE. Check your local listings for showings this Friday.

New Biographical Drama ‘Race’ Opening In Theaters February 19th

A new biographical drama called Race is opening in theaters nationwide this week, which follows the story of Jesse Owens, the Olympian who won four gold medals for track and field at the 1936 Olympics. Ownes’ performance went down in history, not only for his amazing skill, but also for the fact that his victory happened in Berlin, the heart of Adolf Hitler’s supposedly supreme Aryan Race. The film is directed by Stephen Hopkins (Lost in Space, The Reaping) from a script by Joe Shrapnel and Anna Waterhouse (The Tonto Woman, Frankie and Alice) and stars Stephan James (Home Again, Selma), Jason Sudeikis (Horrible Bosses, We’re the Millers), Eli Goree (Godzilla, The 100), Shanice Banton (Degrassi: The Next Generation, A Day Late and a Dollar Short), Carice van Houten (The Fifth Estate, Game of Thrones), Jeremy Irons (The Man in the Iron Mask, Die Hard with a Vengeance), and John Hurt (The Good Shepard, Robin Hood). Considering the ensemble cast and the profoundly positive message, this one might turn out to be one of the more impressive sports biographies recently released, but that’s no slate against Concussion, Foxcatcher, or 42. The trailer is available here on MADE. See it on the big screen this Friday. Enjoy!

New Full Length Trailer For ‘Batman Vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice’ Now Available

Last week fans were able to catch a sneak peak at a scene from the upcoming Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, due out in March 2016. The film is the follow up to director Zack Snyder‘s Man of Steel and the precursor to Warner Bros./DC Comics upcoming Justice League movie, which will follow the next year in 2017. Most of the supporting cast from Man of Steel will be reprising their roles, including Henry Cavill (Stardust, The Man From UNCLE) as Superman, Amy Adams (American Hustle, Big Eyes) as Lois Lane, Diane Lane (Unfaithful, Trumbo), and Michael Shannon (World Trade Center, Revolutionary Road), with newcomers Ben Affleck (Argo, The Town) as Batman, Gal Gadot (Fast Five, Furious 7), Jason Momoa (Game of Thrones, Conan the Barbarian), Jesse Eisenberg (The Social Network, Zombieland), Holly Hunter (The Piano, Oh Brother Where Art Thou?), Jeremy Irons (The Man in the Iron Mask, Die Hard with a Vengeance), and Laurence Fishburne (Apocalypse Now, The Matrix) also joining the cast. The new trailer introduces the major players, including Eisenberg’s Lex Luther and a glimpse of Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman, and also of the opposing relationship between Batman and Superman and the political storm surrounding crime in Metropolis and Gotham City. Check out the full trailer here on MADE, and as always, enjoy!