Tag Archives: untouchables

New Documentary Titled ‘De Palma’ Seeing Release This Week

A new documentary titled De Palma is seeing release this week from directors Jake Paltrow (The Good Night, Boardwalk Empire) and Noah Baumbach (The Squid and the Whale, Greenberg). The film is a chronicle of the life and work of acclaimed director Brian De Palma, whose major body of work has spanned from the 1970s to the present with films like Carrie (1976), a Stephen King novel, Scarface (1983) with Al Pacino (The Godfather, Scent of a Woman) and Michelle Pfeiffer (The Fabulous Baker Boys, Batman Returns), and The Untouchables (1987) with Kevin Costner (Waterworld, Dances with Wolves), Robert De Niro (Goodfellas, Casino), and Sean Connery (Diamonds are Forever, The Hunt for Red October). Despite all of the acclaim and success earned by these films, De Palma is one of the many artists who has never been recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The Untouchables saw Sean Connery win his first Oscar in 1988, Continue reading

Legendary Italian Composer Ennio Morricone Scoring Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Hateful Eight’ and Terrence Malick’s ‘Voyage of Time’

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Composer Ennio Morricone.

2015 will mark the years legendary Italian composer Ennio Morricone makes his return to the western film genre after a 40-year absence. Quentin Tarantino‘s upcoming western The Hateful Eight, out in theaters this December, will feature an original composition by Morricone, who has composed scores for such westerns as A Fistful of Dollars (1964), The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly (1966), Once Upon A Time in the West (1968), Two Mules for Sister Sara (1970), and A Genius, Two Partners, and a Dupe (1975). Morricone will be following up his western composition with the long-awaited drama Voyage of Time from writer/director Terrence Malick (The Thin Red Line, The Tree of Life). Malick’s film features actors Brad Pitt (Fightclub, Inglorious Basterds) and Cate Blanchett (Elizabeth, Blue Jasmine) as narrators as he takes the audience on a visual and musical journey to examine the universe. According to Wild Bunch, “Voyage of Time is a celebration of the earth, displaying the whole of time, from the birth of the universe to its final collapse. This film examines all that went to prepare the miracle that stands before us now. In words and with music, we are encouraged to view it with gratitude and awe. Science and spirit, birth and death, the grand cosmos and the minute life systems of our planet—all come together in Malick’s most original film to date.” This will be the first time Malick has worked with Morricone since his film Days of Heaven (1978); he has spent the last 40 years of his career scoring such films as Leon: The Professional (1981), Once Upon A Time in America (1984), and The Untouchables (1987). Voyage of Time has been held back from release for various reasons for the last few years, but hopefully it will be available in theaters in Fall 2016. Stay tuned for more news.

‘Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation’ Now Playing In Theaters

Tom Cruise (Top Gun, War of the Worlds) is back on the big screen this week in yet another outing as Impossible Mission Force leader Ethan Hunt in Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation. This is the fifth installment in the MI series that started back in 1996 with director Brian De Palma (Scarface, The Untouchables) and screenwriter David Koepp‘s (Jurassic Park, Spider-Man) big screen adaptation of the popular TV series. Since then directors like John Woo, J.J. Abrams, and Brad Bird have stepped in to helm additional sequels, and now Rogue Nation is playing in theaters nationwide from Oscar-winning writer/director Christopher McQuarrie (The Usual Suspects, Jack Reacher). Joining Cruise in the supporting cast are actors Jeremy Renner (The Avengers, The Bourne Legacy), Simon Pegg (Shaun of the Dead, Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol), Rebecca Ferguson (The White Queen, Hercules), and Ving Rhames (Pulp Fiction, Con Air). This time out Hunt and company must take on the Syndicate, a rogue international group of special agents that are out to kill all the members of IMF. Reviews have been pretty positive thus far; fans of the series report lots of action, but you don’t need to have seen the previous films necessarily to enjoy it. Anyway, check it out on the big screen today!

Original ‘Star Trek’ Actor Leonard Nimoy Passes At Age 83

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Leonard Nimoy as Spock in the original Star Trek television series.

Actor Leonard Nimoy, who portrayed Spock in the original Star Trek television series in the 1960s, died this week at the age of 83 in Los Angeles. Nimoy began his career as a regular guest on popular TV shows in the 1950s and early 60s, including The Untouchables, Get Smart, and The Twilight Zone. His breakthrough role came when he was noticed on an episode of The Lieutenant, which earned him the role of Spock in Star Trek, which he would be bound to for the rest of his life. Nimoy portrayed the character of Spock virtually for the rest of his career; he starred in the original TV series and the motion-picture series, even directing the third and fourth films, Star Trek III: The Search for Spock and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. The actor was also an avid photographer and studied at UCLA, later publishing several controversial photography collections titled The Shekhina Project and another called The Full Body Project. His final acting role was as scientist William Bell on the Fox-network drama Fringe, but he also made a special appearance in director J.J. Abrams‘ 2009 re-boot film Star Trek, and again in Star Trek: Into Darkness (2013). Nimoy leaves behind his wife Susan and his son and daughter Adam and Julie; may he rest in peace.

2015 Celebrates 25 Years Of Classic Cinema…1990 Movie Anniversaries

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2015 is going to be a very big year for movies. An unprecedented number of blockbuster sequels will be opening on the big screen this year, including Hot Tub Time Machine 2, Fast and Furious 7, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Mad Max: Fury Road, Jurassic World, Ted 2, Terminator: Genisys, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay-Part 2, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens. But an equally impressive number of films will also be celebrating their 25th anniversaries this year, including several big-name films that have become cinematic classics. At the top of the list are Martin Scorsese‘s Goodfellas and Francis Ford Coppola‘s The Godfather Part III. Oscar-winner Robert DeNiro lead Scorsese’s dramatic adaptation of Nicholas Pileggi’s biographical novel of mafia hoodlums hustling in the streets of New York with co-stars Ray Liota and Joe Pesci, while Oscar-winner-to-be Al Pacino returned to reprise his role as New York crime-boss Michael Corleone in Coppola’s final installment in his epic-mafia trilogy. Diane Keaton and Talia Shire both returned for their respective roles, as well as newcomer Andy Garcia, who had been seen in Brian DePalma’s 1987 Chicago-mafia hit The Untouchables. Joe Pesci also has his name on another 1990 classic: writer John Hughes’ Home Alone, with MaCaulay Culkin and Daniel Stern. Also making the list is Tim Burton and Johnny Depp‘s dramatic-fantasy classic Edward Scissorhands, and Kevin Costner’s Academy Award-winning drama Dances With Wolves. Other classics that made 1990 a great cinematic year were releases like Warren Beatty’s comic-strip parody Dick Tracy with Madonna and Al Pacino, director Frank Marshall’s creepy-critter-thriller Arachnophobia, Stephen King‘s suspense-tale Misery with James Caan, the live-action Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movie, Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman, Arnold Schwarzenegger in Total Recall, Whoopi Goldberg’s haunting by Patrick Swayze in Ghost, Sean Connery and Alec Baldwin in The Hunt For Red October, and finally, John McTiernan’s action-sequel Die Hard 2 and Michael J. Fox‘s final round as Marty McFly in Back To The Future Part III. Happy 25th Anniversary to all these features, and if you haven’t seen any of these movies, you should definitely add them to your Must-See list… Enjoy!

Writer/Director Mike Binder’s ‘Black Or White’ Now Playing In Theaters

Writer/director Mike Binder (The Upside of Anger, Reign Over Me) has a new project in theaters this week titled Black or White with Academy Award winners Kevin Kostner (The Untouchables, Dances With Wolves) and Octavia Spencer (The Help, Fruitvale Station). The film follows a grandfather who receives custody of his granddaughter and ensues in a custody battle with her paternal grandmother (Spencer) and her father after her mother dies. What follows is an interesting look of culture-clash and understanding as the two families come to work together in their child’s best interest. Also making up the supporting cast are actors Jillian Estell (Chase, So This Is Christmas), Bill Burr (Date Night, The Heat), Anthony Mackie (The Hurt Locker, Gangster Squad), and Gillian Jacobs (Walk of Shame, Community). Check out the trailer here on MADE.

MADE Review: ‘A Most Violent Year’


If you haven’t had a chance to go and see A Most Violent Year yet, you should be aware of what you’re walking into before you go. While the movie, itself, is really well done, and, in my opinion is a very good movie, if you’re expecting a big violent mafia flick, you’re going to be extremely disappointed. Writer/director J.C. Chandor‘s screenplay was very well written; he conveys the themes of the movie very clearly and the plot allows for a refreshing look of the hardworking American immigrant and the belief in strong family values. But as far as violence goes, the movie is definitely lacking, especially considering the title is A Most Violent Year, which really only relates to 1981 when the story takes place, one of New York City’s most violent years on record. Other than that it felt like the same story could have been put into modern times and it still would have made sense. All that aside, the acting performances by Golden Globe nominees Oscar Isaac (Robin Hood, Inside Llewyn Davis) and Jessica Chastain (The Help, Interstellar), and also that of supporting cast members Albert Brooks (Taxi Driver, Drive) and David Oyelowo (Lincoln, Selma) are outstanding, and Chandor’s filmmaking is exceptional and well deserved of recognition. So if you go in expecting more of a Coppola (The Godfather)-like movie as opposed to a Scorsese (Mean Streets, Goodfellas) or DePalma (Scarface, The Untouchables)-like movie, I think you’ll really enjoy it. Here’s the trailer one more time.

Hollywood Hits Chicago

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Chicago is no stranger to movies. With its large metropolitan area and aboveground transit system, Chicago has become a recent hub for big blockbusters in the last 30 years. Movies including The Dark Knight and the 2002 movie-musical Chicago bare great tribute to the city’s monuments and history, including the culture and music that has grown with the city throughout the 20th century. Here’s a look at some of those memorable moments in movies that have captured the look and/or feel of The Windy City.

1) The Blues Brothers (1980)

If you live in Chicago, and you haven’t seen this movie…you may seriously want to consider moving! Director John Landis reunited with Animal House favorite John Belushi, and Dan Aykroyd to write and direct The Blues Brothers. With a wild chase scene all across The Loop and guest appearances by Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin, Carrie Fisher and James Brown, The Blues Brothers is one of the quintessential Chicago movies. The film is a triumphant blend of slapstick comedy and large-scale musical numbers, which makes The Blues Brothers a must see if you live in Chicago or you just want to hear some great music and have some laughs in the process!

2) Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986)

Not only does this movie take us all over Chicago, including the famous Parade scene that was filmed right downtown, it has also gone down as one of the greats of filmmaker John Hughes, whose writing and directing credits include The Breakfast Club, Sixteen Candles, Pretty in Pink, Home Alone 1 and 2, and National Lampoon’s European and Christmas Vacations’. Ferris Bueller has become an 80s movies icon, but not only because of Hughes’ writing and directing talents. Yes, we all know that Matthew Broderick was probably at his best when he made this movie, but a great amount of credit is owed also to actor Jeffery Jones, who portrays Principle Ed Rooney in such a cartoonish way, it’s impossible not to laugh at his childish antics and his undeserved pompous demeanor! This movie is a great watch, every time!

3) The Untouchables (1987)

With the same director as Scarface, the story of the most famous gangster of the Prohibition era, and the original James Bond, how can you not expect good things from this movie? Brian DePalma directed this epic story of a U.S. Treasury officer who forms a team of honest police with the sole purpose of charging and sentencing Al Capone. Not only did The Untouchables score three Academy Awards nominations for Best Art Direction (Set Decoration), Best Costume Design and Best Music (Original Score), it also won Sean Connery his first Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Chicago also played a starring role in the film. Several scenes were filmed right downtown on LaSalle Street, and even a climactic scene involving a mother and her infant playing pickle in a gun fight was shot right in the entrance to Union Station on Canal Street and Jackson Blvd. If you’re a history fan, or you just want to get a feel about Chicago and Al Capone, The Untouchables is a must see!

4) The Fugitive (1993)

Harrison Ford and Tommy Lee Jones star in this modern update of the 1963-1967 television series of the same name. The storyline is pretty loyal to the original series, which tells of Dr. Richard Kimble and his escape from prison after being wrongly convicted of murdering his wife and now must prove his innocence. Ford does a decent enough job as Dr. Kimble, the character not being all around complex but a little more of the quiet type. The highlight of the film, however, is Tommy Lee Jones, who steels the stage with his portrayal of U.S. Marshal Sam Gerard, winning him the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 1994. The Fugitive is filled with both suspense and mystery, at points drawing you to the edge of your seat, and you definitely get some good shots of Chicago too! Look for the famous fight scene that takes place right on the CTA…its good shit!

5) Transformers: Dark of the Moon (2011)

Director Michael Bay had already made a great success of the first two Transformers movies, which also brought Megan Fox into the spotlight and threw Shia LeBeouf to the top of the list of Hollywood A-List actors. I was less impressed with the storyline than I was with the first two films, but then the writers did have to patch up the story after Megan Fox’s untimely withdrawal. But what Michael Bay lacks in story he makes up for in action and special effects, scoring Academy nominations for Sound Editing, Mixing, and Visual Effects. And if you ever wondered what it would be like if all-out war broke out in the Loop, all you have to do is watch this movie! The visual effects are so incredible, you can literally watch Chicago get blown and smashed to bits, including the new Trump Tower which seems to take the worst of the damage. Be sure to pay attention to the skydiving scene too. Five divers actually flew around the skyscrapers surrounding the Loop on Randolph, Lake and Michigan Avenue!