Tag Archives: stanley

This Week Marks 36th Anniversary of Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining’

May 23rd, 1980 saw the release of one of director Stanley Kubrick‘s most iconic films, The Shining. Initially a commercial flop, the film has gone down as an iconic Hollywood masterpiece, and one of Kubrick’s most celebrated films. Based on a novel by author Stephen King (Carrie, Salem’s Lot), who admittedly is not a big fan of Kubrick’s adaptation, The Shining combines a a series of bizarre elements with Kubrick’s carefully crafted filmmaking, exploring the darker side of the human subconscious. Kubrick was a popular director at the time the film came up for production. He had previously released such renowned films as 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and A Clockwork Orange (1971), which had earned him a great amount of control when it came to making his films. The production on The Shining, however, was not what anyone had expected, taking more than a year to film at a budget that ended up at $18 million. What’s more, critical reception was incredibly harsh against Kubrick and lead actors Jack Nicholson (Chinatown, The Departed) and Shelley DuVall (Annie Hall, The Portrait of a Lady), even though the film did end up grossing $44 million. Continue reading

Look For This Week’s Limited Releases In Theaters Near You

Several limited releases will be available in select theaters this week.

1. The Benefactor

First on the list is a new drama titled The Benefactor with Richard Gere (Unfaithful, Chicago), Dakota Fanning (War of the Worlds, The Twilight Saga: New Moon), and Theo James (Underworld: Awakening, Insurgent) about a philanthropist who construes the lives of young couples in an attempt to relive his past. This will be the first feature-length film by writer/director Andrew Renzi (Karaoke!, Fishtail), who is also lined up to write an upcoming biographical film on Janis Joplin.

2. Moonwalkers

Moonwalkers is a new comedy from director Antoine Bardou-Jacquet (Wacky Races) starring Ron Perlman (Hellboy, Sons of Anarchy) and Rupert Grint, aka Ron Weasley from the Harry Potter film franchise. The film focuses on the conspiracy theory in which legendary film director Stanley Kubrick (2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange) is recruited by the CIA to stage the 1969 Lunar landing. Perlman stars as the stiff CIA agent tasked with recruiting Kubrick, and Grint plays a sketchy rock band manager who Perlman is forced to team up with to pull it off. This one definitely seems like its worth giving a chance.

3. A Perfect Day

With an all-star cast lead by Oscar-winning actors Benicio Del Toro (Traffic, Sicario) and Tim Robbins (The Shawshank Redemption, Mystic River), this comedic drama follows a group of relief aid workers who must work to resolve a crisis in the middle of an armed war zone. Writer/director Fernando Leon de Aranoa (Mondays in the Sun, Princesas) took up the reigns on this one, which may or may not find success with comedy audiences, despite the excellent filmmaking team behind it.

Enjoy!

Toronto International Film Festival Headliners ‘Trumbo’ and ‘Spotlight’ Opening In Theaters This Friday


Movie-goers will have no shortage of great movies to see this weekend. Friday will not only have the chance to see The Peanuts Movie and the new James Bond installment, Spectre, but fans of festival-circuit films will also be able to see two major picks from this years’ Toronto International Film Festival. The first is the biographical drama from director Jay Roach (Meet the Parents, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery) with Golden Globe winner Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad, Godzilla) titled Trumbo. The film follows the famous screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, who along with 300 other writers and filmmakers in Hollywood was blacklisted by the federal government during the Red Scare era of the American 1950s. Trumbo is, perhaps, one of the more interesting cases; he continued to write scripts under anonymous surnames while he was blacklisted and even won Oscars for his work on Roman Holiday (1953) and The Brave One (1956). Making up the supporting cast are actors Diane Lane (Unfaithful, Man of Steel), Helen Mirren (The Queen, The Hundred-Foot Journey), Louis C.K. (Louie, American Hustle), Elle Fanning (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Maleficent), John Goodman (The Big Lebowski, Argo), and Michael Stuhlbarg (Pawn Sacrifice, Steve Jobs), in a script adpated by John McNamara (Jericho, Aquarius) from the book Dalton Trumbo by author Bruce Cook. The second Toronto International Film Festival contender opening in theaters this week is also a biographical drama titled Spotlight. This film comes from Oscar-nominated writer/director Tom McCarthy (The Station Agent, Million Dollar Arm) and chronicles the investigative journalist team at the Boston Globe that uncovered the scandal in the Catholic Church revolving around child molestation and cover-up deals within the Archdiocese. Co-written by screenwriter Josh Singer (Fringe, The Fifth Estate), the film stars Mark Ruffalo (Shutter Island, The Avengers), Michael Keaton (Batman, Birdman or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), Rachel McAdams (Wedding Crashers, Midnight in Paris), Liev Schreiber (Defiance, Salt), John Slattery (Mad Men, Flags of our Fathers), and Stanley Tucci (Transformers: Age of Extinction, The Hunger Games), and also received high marks at the 2015 Venice Film Festival. Either of these will make great picks to see on the big screen, so be sure to get to the movie theaters in the next week or so to see them while they are still available! The trailer for Trumbo is available here on MADE.

Director Marc Forster To Helm Late Stanley Kubrick Civil War Drama ‘The Downslope’

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Academy Award winner (and 13x nominee) Stanley Kubrick is well deserved of his reputation and stature as one of Hollywood’s most celebrated filmmakers. He passed away in 1999, but his long-standing legacy included such films as A Clockwork Orange (1971), 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Full Metal Jacket (1987), The Shining (1980), and his last film with Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman, Eyes Wide Shut (1999), all of which he wrote and produced himself. Now, 16 years after his death, Kubrick’s storytelling will be able to reach modern audiences in the form of a new film trilogy by director Marc Forster (Finding Neverland, Monster’s Ball) called The Downslope. The script for Downslope was actually written by Kubrick back in 1956 and revolved around a feud between Union General George Armstrong Custer and Confederate Colonel John Singleton Mosby and his Mosby’s Rangers, who time-and-again succeeded in raids and surprise-attacks against the much larger Union militants. Forster will actually be developing a trilogy of films following Kubrick’s script, which he developed over several years with historian Shelby Foote while researching Custer and Mosby, even drawing up maps and details of the battle scenes and how he would have filmed it. Obviously Kubrick, himself, never ended up making the movie, but considering his extensive work in its production, Forster should be able to get pretty close to his original vision, only with modern filmmaking technology. Information on a release date or casting is not yet available, but we’ll keep an eye out for more news. Stay tuned!

Stanley Kubrick Box-Set Collection Hits Stores In Time For Christmas

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Kubrick on the set of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

Iconic film director Stanley Kubrick, who died in 1999, is behind some of the most memorable films of the twentieth century, including 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), A Clockwork Orange (1971), The Shining (1980), and Full Metal Jacket (1987), and has worked with actors like Jack Nicholson, R. Lee Ermey, Adam Baldwin, Malcolm McDowell, Tom Cruise, and Nicole Kidman. Known for his obsessive style of moviemaking, the director received critical acclaim throughout the course of his career, not only for his unique style of story-telling, but also for his attention to detail. That being said, he could also be credited as one of Hollywood’s most unrecognized directors, receiving more than 10 Oscar nominations but only securing one in 1968 for Best Visual Effects (2001: A Space Odyssey), with four additional Golden Globe nominations, but no wins. Despite all that, Kubrick has still managed to maintain a strong influence on modern filmmakers more than a decade after his death, including The Dark Knight and Inception director Christopher Nolan, whose new film, Interstellar, has been cited as a modern day 2001 by many critics and movie-goers. Now Kubrick’s legacy is being celebrated with a new DVD/Blu-Ray 10-disc box-set titled Stanley Kubrick: The Masterpiece Collection, due out in stores this December 2nd. The set not only includes 10 of Kubrick’s iconic collection, including Lolita (1962), Dr. Strangelove (1964), 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), The Shining (1980), Full Metal Jacket (1987), and his final film Eyes Wide Shut (1999), it also includes new special features like behind-the-scenes documentaries and interviews. So if you’re a fan of Kubrick’s you should definitely add this to your Christmas list.

Stanley Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ Will See Theatrical Re-Release In UK


In the times before George Lucas created Star Wars, and Star Trek saw it’s theatrical debut, iconic filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, whose genius shines through in projects like The Shining, A Clockwork Orange, and Full Metal Jacket, envisioned a philosophical journey through time and space in a film called 2001: A Space Odyssey. Released in 1968 and blending classical orchestral arrangements to visually stunning effects, the film set a new standard for all science-fiction and space adventure films to come, winning an Oscar in 1969 for Best Visual Effects and receiving three additional Oscar nominations for Best Director (Kubrick), Best Writing/Screenplay (Kubrick and author Arthur C. Clarke), and Best Art Direction (Set Decoration). 2001 begins in the times of pre-history and spans all the way to futuristic colonized space, where astronaut Dave Bowman must embark on an epic journey to Jupiter in the hopes of discovering the origins of humanity and our place in the ever-expanding universe. The story was initially loosely based on a short story of Aurthur C. Clarke‘s titled The Sentinel, which Kubrick and Clarke then expanded upon and simultaneously wrote the film screenplay and the novel that was published shortly after the film was released. While Clarke’s novel speaks in more direct tones to explain the philosophy behind the story, Kubrick’s film is more famously known for it’s enigmatic style of story-telling, relying heavily on visual interpretation and utilizing extremely light amounts of dialogue. Since it’s release, 2001 has become known as a modern cinematic masterpiece, and with director Christopher Nolan‘s Interstellar coming to theaters this November (Nolan has referenced 2001 a number of times making Interstellar), audiences in the UK will get to experience Kubrick’s film on the big screen once again. Check out this new trailer for 2001, and if you haven’t seen it and don’t plan on taking a European vacation anytime soon, definitely go out and rent it. You won’t regret it!

Brad Pitt To Star In ‘The Operators’ From Director David Michod

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The Operators is a non-fiction novel from author Michael Hastings, which follows the real-life story of General Stanley McChrystal, who lead U.S. forces in Afghanistan during the War on Terror. Hastings traveled to Afghanistan in the spring of 2010 and published an article in Rolling Stone based on his observations of McChrystal and his staff relaxing and openly criticizing Obama and his administration, which lead to McChrystal’s dismissal from duty. Hastings published the book The Operators in 2012 and now that novel will be the inspiration for a new movie from director David Michod, and Brad Pitt may be aiming to star in the project. Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner will be producing the film under Pitt’s production company, Plan B, which will also receive assistance from New Regency Productions and RatPac Entertainment to finance the project. The movie is still early in pre-production so we’ll have to wait for more news. Stay tuned.

Visual Effects Icon Doug Trumbull To Debut Short Film ‘UFOTOG’ At Seattle’s Cinerama Sci-Fi Film Festival 2014

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Doug Trumbull has made a name for himself in Hollywood for the last 50 years for his work in the visual effects department. He has worked with directors like Stanley Kubric, Steven Spielberg, and Ridley Scott on iconic films such as 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), and Blade Runner (1982), and has directed around ten short films throughout the course of his career. Now Trumbull is getting ready to release a new 12-minute short film that he wrote and directed, entitled UFOTOG, at this year’s sci-fi film festival at Seattle’s Cinerama Theatre. The project is an experimental 4K 3D 120FPS film and demonstrates Trumbull’s new process called MAGI, a technical language that is supposed to immerse the audience in the film in a way that can’t be done with conventional film techniques. The film will also receive help from Christie Digital, who will provide a special digital projector to show the film at the festival. The projector is said to have the highest frame speed for a commercial project, and will be used for the UFOTOG premiere. Cinerama will host the festival from May 1-12 this year and will feature a number of new and classic films; you can check out more on the theatre and festival on their Facebook page.