Tag Archives: francis

Tribeca Film Festival Closes With ‘Reservoir Dogs’ and ‘The Godfather’ Cast Reunion

reservoir dogs 25th reunion

This year’s Tribeca Film Festival will not only be remembered for its impressive array of films, but also for a number of controversial firsts. An airline commercial was pulled from showing, reporters were infuriated to find James Franco and Shai LaBeouf absent from a red carpet premiere, and the new Immersive Storyscapes feature allowed audiences to experience virtual reality in an all new way. As if all that wasn’t enough, the 2017 celebration wrapped with special showings and cast reunions for two of the biggest films in history: Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs and Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather. Continue reading

This Week In Movie History…

On December 1, 1983, director Brian de Palma (The Untouchables, Carlito’s Way) released his modernized version of Ben Hecht and Howard Hawks’ 1930s gangster drama, Scarface. While the original followed a charismatic Chicago mobster in the Prohibition era, de Palma’s version took the character to violent world of the 1980s drug trade in Miami, Florida. Fueled by Al Pacino‘s riveting performance and backed by an outstanding supporting cast that included Michelle Pfeiffer (What Lies Beneath, Batman Returns), Steven Bauer (Raising Cain, Primal Fear), Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio (The Abyss, The Perfect Storm) and Robert Loggia (Big, Independence Day), Scarface ushered in a new era of gangster movies far darker than Francis Coppola’s The Godfather series just a decade before. One of the primary reasons is because of de Palma’s direction. Continue reading

This Week In Movie History…

August 15th is a very significant date in the history of film…for two reasons. We’ll cover them here in order by date, but both are, no doubt, some of the most memorable advances in movies and storytelling.

On August 15, 1934, director Christy Cabanne (The Mummy’s Hand, Scared to Death) released the first audio-visual film adaptation of Charlotte Bronte‘s famous novel Jane Eyre. Excluding the popularity of the novel, the film was part of a series of classic-literary adaptations produced by Monogram Pictures between 1933-1934. Four classic 19th-century novels were all made into big-screen adaptations that featured sound, a new technology for the era. The novels were Oliver Twist, Black Beauty, Jane Eyre, and The Moonstone. Cabanne was well-known at the time as a silent film director, but was also beginning to indulge in sound-projects. For the movie, which only runs a total of 62 minutes, the studio recruited actors Colin Clive, best known for the role of Dr. Frankenstein in the original 1931 James Whales’ classic, and newcomer Virginia Bruce (Born to Dance, The Invisible Woman) to star as Jane Eyre. Oscar-nominated screenwriter Adele Comandini (Beyond Tomorrow, Three Smart Girls) to adapt Bronte’s novel for the film (which admittedly must have been a challenge considering Jane Eyre runs for a total of 38 chapters with 400+ pages in most publications).

Also on August 15th, but in 1979, Oscar-winning director Francis Ford Coppola (The Godfather, The Conversation) released his world-renowned masterpiece, Apocalypse Now. The film is famous not only for its cinematic brilliance, but also for its whirlwind of a production Continue reading

Today In Movie History…

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Today in movie history, revered editor and sound engineer Walter Murch was born in New York City in 1943. Murch first gained momentum in the film industry working with Oscar-winner Francis Ford Coppola on his film The Rain People (1969) before going on to work with George Lucas on THX1138 (1971) and American Graffiti (1973). He then furthered his professional relationship with Coppola working on films like The Godfather Part II (1974) and The Conversation (1974), the latter which earned him his first Academy Award nomination. His first major contribution to film came on Coppola’s iconic Vietnam drama, Apocalypse Now (1979), for which he won his first Oscar. Murch used a multi-track recording system to create new sounds that invoked both physical tension and psychological drama against the back-drop of Coppola’s war epic. Murch went on to serve as both sound and picture editor for numerous films, winning double Oscars for The English Patient in 1996 for Best Editor and Best Sound Editor. His work with Coppola continued throughout his career, working on films like The Godfather Part III (1990) and Tetro (2009); he also received a double Oscar-nomination in 1990 for The Godfather Part III and Ghost with Patrick Swayze, Demi Moore, and Whoopi Goldberg. Continue reading

Memorable Movie Monologues…

Taking a moment to appreciate the artistry behind acting, I’d like to highlight some of the most memorable, if not noteworthy monologues ever seen on the big screen. Traditionally, a monologue is a long speech delivered by an actor of the stage or screen, during which either a climactic realization is reached or a larger audience is being addressed. I’ll begin with what I consider to be one of the greatest (if not the greatest) films ever made, Francis Ford Coppola‘s The Godfather Part II. The Godfather Part II is known as the most successful movie sequel of all time, earning a total of 11 Academy Award nominations and winning 6. Among the nominees was method-actor Lee Strasberg, who co-founded the Group Theatre in 1931 and became director of the Actors Studio in 1950. Strasberg influenced a new generation of stage actors, including up-and-coming Broadway actor Al Pacino. When Pacino broke into film with The Godfather and was brought back for Part II, he asked Coppola to cast his mentor Strasberg in the supporting cast. Strasberg took the role of mob-boss Hyman Roth, and earned one of the film’s Oscar nominations for Best Supporting Actor. Continue reading

Character Actor Abe Vigoda Passes At The Age of 94

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Character actor Abe Vigoda passed away earlier this week at the age of 94. According to his daughter, Carol Vigoda Fuchs, the actor died peacefully and had not been suffering from any illnesses. Vigoda spent years working in the New York theater scene before he was cast as the mafia hitman Sal Tessio in Francis Ford Coppola‘s The Godfather. Following the huge success of The Godfather, and The Godfather Part II, Vigoda was cast as Detective Phil Fish in 1975 on the show Barney Miller, which ran until 1982 and earned Vigoda three Emmy Award nominations in 1976, 1977, and 1978 respectively. Ironically enough, the announcement of his death re-sparked an old controversy about whether or not the actor was still alive: a false report stating that Vigoda had died was published in 1986, igniting a controversy among movie-goers and fans as to whether or not the actor was really still alive or had actually died. A website dedicated to Google searches for ‘Is Abe Vigoda really dead?’ was updated this week to respond ‘Yes.’ Regardless of his questionable death status, Vigoda’s roles and contributions to film will be remembered by his co-stars like Al Pacino (Serpico, Heat), Robert Duvall (Apocalypse Now, The Judge), and Hal Linden (Barney Miller, Out To Sea). Abe, you will be missed!

Steven Spielberg’s New Cold-War Drama ‘Bridge of Spies’ Opening In Theaters This Week

Finally after months of anticipation and sitting through rounds of film festivals around the globe, Oscar-winner Steven Spielberg‘s (Jaws, Saving Private Ryan) new Cold-War drama Bridge of Spies is opening on big screens across the country this week. Starring Spielberg-regular Tom Hanks (Catch Me If You Can, Forrest Gump) in the lead role, the film focuses on James B. Donovan, an attorney who was sent to Soviet Russia by the CIA in order to negotiate the release of suspected U-2 Spy Plane pilot Francis G. Powers. The script was originally penned by screenwriter Matt Charman, but was then re-worked by Oscar-winning filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen (Oh Brother Where Art Thou?, No Country For Old Men) before Spielberg began the process of principle photography. Also starring in the film are actors Mark Rylance (The Other Boleyn Girl, Anonymous), Domenick Lombardozzi (Phone Booth, The Wire), Victor Verhaeghe (August Rush, The Wolf of Wall Street), Alan Alda (MASH, The Aviator), and Amy Ryan (Gone Baby Gone, Birdman or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), with Austin Stowell (Behind the Candelabra, Whiplash) starring as Powell. This will be Spielberg’s first directorial project since 2012’s Lincoln, which earned the director two Oscar-nods for Best Director and Best Picture. Look for Bridge of Spies in theaters this Friday. The trailer is available here on MADE.

Steven Spielberg’s ‘Bridge of Spies’ Opening In Theaters October 16th


Steven Spielberg has been busy acting as producer to a number of projects since his last directorial feature Lincoln in 2012 with features like Transformers: Age of Extinction, The Hundred-Foot Journey, and Jurassic World. But fans will get to see his latest project featuring his Saving Private Ryan and Catch Me If You Can collaborating actor Tom Hanks open on big screens this October 16th. The film is titled Bridge of Spies and follows Hanks as attorney James Donovan, who was recruited to negotiate the release of Francis Gary Powers, a U-2 pilot who was shot down and held prisoner by the KGB under suspicion of espionage during the Cold War in 1960. Filmmaking brothers Joel and Ethan Coen (The Big Lebowski, No Country For Old Men) were brought on to rewrite the original screenplay before principle photography began on the film, which stars Amy Ryan (Gone Baby Gone, Birdman), Mark Rylance (The Other Boleyn Girl, Blitz), Austin Stowell (Love and Honor, Whiplash), and Alan Alda (MASH, The Aviator). Seeing as it was produced by Walt Disney Pictures, I think that Spielberg intentionally steered away from a lot of Restricted-content (and it did, in fact, receive a PG-13 rating), but with Hanks in the spotlight it should prove a solid endeavor all the same. Last time we heard about this one a poster had just become available via twitter, but now the full length trailer is available here on MADE! Enjoy!

New Comedy ‘Vacation’ Opening In Theaters This Friday, July 31st


It’s finally here! The new Vacation movie is opening on big screens across the country this Friday, July 31st. Directed by comedy acting/writing duo John Francis Daley and Jonathan M. Goldstein (The Incredible Burt Wonderstone, Horrible Bosses 2), the movie pays homage to the original National Lampoon classic as now-grown-up Rusty Griswold takes his family on a new cross-country road trip to Walley World, full of its own hilarious twists and turns. Leading the cast are actors Ed Helms (The Hangover, We’re The Millers), Christina Applegate (Married…With Children, Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy), Chris Hemsworth (Thor, Rush), Leslie Mann (The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up), and original Vacation actors Chevy Chase (Christmas Vacation, Caddyshack) and Beverly D’Angelo (European Vacation, Entourage). Check out the trailer here on MADE, then be sure to add this to your weekend plans!

New Showtime Documentary ‘Listen To Me Marlon’ Opening Nationwide This Fall


A new documentary from Showtime Documentary Films, Listen To Me Marlon, will be opening in theaters nationwide this fall. As implied, the film takes a personal perspective on the life and career of 2-time Academy Award-winning actor Marlon Brando, narrated by Brando, himself, from hours of audio tapes from his personal archives. Writer/director Stevan Riley (Fire In Babylon, Everything Or Nothing) compiled Brando’s narrations along with hours of archival film footage of the actor with the help of co-writer Peter Ettedgui (Vigo: A Passion For Life, Everything Or Nothing). Brando is considered among many film historians and critics to be one of the greatest actors in history, give-or-take a few others. He is probably best known for his portrayal of the title role in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather, but his dynamic talents lead him to portray a vast array of characters throughout his career in films like A Street Car Named Desire (1951), Julius Caesar (1953), and On The Water Front (1955), the latter of which earned him his first Oscar. He won his second Oscar for The Godfather in 1972 but famously refused to show-up to accept it and instead sent a young Native American woman in his place, making a political protest against the persecution of Native Americans in the United States. Nevertheless Brando went on to star in such films as Superman (1978) and Apocalypse Now (1979), imbedding himself in American culture until his death in 2004. Listen To Me Marlon first premiered earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival and is scheduled to be shown at the Film Forum on July 29th in New York City, and then 2-days later at LA’s Landmark Theater before the nationwide release in the fall. We’ll keep an eye out for an official release date.